09 Apr

Guest blog: Breastfeeding during Ramadan

BfN peer supporter and Camden Baby Feeding Team member Zamzam Elmi talks about her experience breastfeeding 4 children through Ramadan, and the decision she made each time. She also explores how we can best support Muslim mums to breastfeed during Ramadan, whether they decide to fast or not.

Ramadan Karim! May we all have a fulfilling and blessed month.

Firstly, I would like to say that Allah is aware of what you can bear or manage and will not expect beyond that.

Deciding on whether to fast or not is a tough and spiritually challenging decision to make especially knowing how blessed/special the month is, but we are fortunate that we have been given concessions by his mercy.

Remember that breastfeeding is a form of worship if done with right intention, and taking advantage of the concession is God given right to protect us and our babies.

Listen to your body and keep an eye on your baby if you do decide to fast, speak to a health professional if you have any concerns or worries. Also take your prenatal vitamin as levels of nutrients such magnesium, potassium and zinc may be affected.

Every drop of breast milk is reward gained and you can still gain more spiritually by reading the Quran and doing your dhikr whilst breastfeeding or bottle feeding. This is a lovely time to bond with your baby as well as lifting you spiritually and emotionally.

With all my children I did different things depending on the situation.

  • My first child was premature and I was expressing, so during his first few week of life I fasted some days and not others.
  • With my second child, I could not fast at all as she feed frequently. I made up the fast later once she was weaned.
  • As for my 3rd child, also exclusively breast fed, I managed to fast the full month with good preparation and knowing how to take care of myself whilst fasting.
  • With my 4th, I also fasted most days, and I gave fidya [feeding the poor for each day missed].

Supporting Breastfeeding During Ramadan

As peer supporters, we have great duty in supporting mums to feel empowered to achieve their goals by giving information so their decisions are informed. Supporting mothers during Ramadan is no different to helping mums reduce factors that may have a negative impact on their breast feeding or supply.

Things to consider are:

  • If a mum is fasting during the summer months (this usually an 18hr fast with 5/6hrs window to eat) she will need to drink little and often and during the times she is allowed to eat and drink.
  • Mums will need to eat high nutrient dense food such as date, fruits and nuts to help replace the magnesium, zinc and potassium levels that may reduce during fasting.
  • Avoid drinking too many caffeinated drinks and replace with water, fresh fruits juice, herbal teas and green smoothies.
  • If a mum is fasting during the winter months which can fall between 10/12hrs of fasting, this is much easier as the sunset is much earlier and they have a longer period to eat and drinking during dawn. So really its like having a very late lunch.

If a mum is exclusively breastfeeding and has a baby of 0-6months, its highly not recommended she fast at all, this is because of the increased nutritional demand. As I have done on many occasions, mums can make up the fast later or feed someone poor as a compensation but to also feel the spirit of Ramadan.

Some of the questions mums may have during Ramadan will be around supply and how best to protect it. Also, just as a reminder feeding support will not differ as the same information will apply when it comes to protecting supply and breastfeeding. Success in having enough to feed the baby depends on staying well hydrated, reducing stress and keeping breastfeeding as close/normal to when they are not fasting. If a mum is mix feeding, it’s important to give the usual information on how bottle feeds can impact the breastfeeding, as well as the fact that she maybe more likely to increase the bottle feeds to help cope with demand. It’s important she has the facts so she is aware of the possible risks.

We must remember to keep giving mum a safe space where they feel they have permission to come and talk through their decisions without judgment or fear of being misunderstood. This will help you protect the well-being of both mum and baby. Another question might be how do I know if I or baby are dehydrated? When should I seek help? It’s important to make sure a mum feels safe to come for support if her decision to fast has had an adverse effect on their health.

Muslim mums know they may be able to fast if theirs or their baby’s health is not adversely affected during that period of fasting. It’s good to remember they are well experienced in fasting and they come from a place of having knowledge of what its like.

For peer supporters who are not Muslim or who may not know much about Ramadan, it is imperative to keep in mind that choice should always be at the forefront of any breastfeeding journey and the support we provide will very much be based on an individual case by case basis. It’s also okay to say I’m not sure and signpost/refer mums to other sources for more information.

For more information on breastfeeding during Ramadan, click here: https://breastfeeding.support/breastfeeding-during-ramadan/

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29 Mar

Breastfeeding If You Are On The Autistic Spectrum

As part of World Autism Awareness Week, BfN and National Breastfeeding Helpline Helper Katrona draws on her own experiences to share some information about breastfeeding when you are on the autistic spectrum.

The term autistic will be used here instead of a person with autism because many people with autism (including the author) see it as part of who they are and not just something they have and therefore is their preferred term.

Thanks to the media, when people think of autism, they often think of stereotypical autism – male, non-verbal, rocking back and forth or stimming (repetitive movement) or being a savant (having special skills, like Dustin Hoffman in the film Rain Man). 

Autism is not an illness, it just means that your brain works in a different way from the general population. It can mean that you have difficulty with social interactions and communication – it is said that up to 93% of communication is through body language, so it can be hard when you are depending on the 7% verbal component to understand what people are meaning when they speak. Sensory issues – your senses are too high or dulled meaning you experience touch, sight, sound too intensely or have trouble recognising and feeling changes in them. Autistic people often like order and certainty in life, have black and white thinking and can find comfort when the world follows logical rules.

Like myself, many females who are diagnosed with autism are diagnosed at a later stage of life instead of childhood, usually after they have had their own children. 

So what has this to do with breastfeeding?

Well first of all females can be autistic, have children and breastfeed. Due to diagnosis criteria and the fact that from an early age girls learn to mask (changing your behaviour to fit in to what society deem socially acceptable) instead of a diagnosis of autism they are misdiagnosed with anxiety or depression. This may mean any challenges faced when breastfeeding are not addressed

The challenges faced by autistic breastfeeding mothers vary and can include:

Sensory issues

Feeling “touched out” and “touch overload” being misinterpreted as a feeding aversion.

Interpreting touch as pain or having less sensation of pain and not realising damage is being done to the nipples.

Communication

Phrases like “you are looking for three dirty nappies a day and five wet nappies” – does this mean if my baby is peeing ten times a day or pooping after every feed is it a problem? Vague terms like “some mums may find” and “heavy nappies” can be confusing and cause over worry and anxiety.

Trouble taking in large amounts of instructions at one time or focusing on breastfeeding and reading detailed studies and both cause confusion.

Changes

There is a lot of uncertainly with babies, they don’t do what the books say they will, they change their routines and when your life is easier if there is an order to it and predictability, dealing with a new born can be very overwhelming. The lack of sleep and uncertainty can disrupt coping methods and exasperate the effects that autism can have on your life.

These can all be negative when breastfeeding with autism but there are plenty of positives as well. Breastfeeding can cut down on anxiety and worry – there is no need to measure formula out, make sure bottles are properly sterilised. Can help with mother/baby bonding by bringing a sense of normality to the mother, being able to do what neurotypical mothers do, and not feeling so different. Cuts down on sensory overload – the easiest way to settle a crying baby is to stick it on your breast, stops crying instantly, no need to wait for a bottle to be prepared.

Most of the challenges can be overcome or lessened by good communication with health care providers and supporters, thinking about the individual problems and finding new strategies and coping methods to address them. Many autistic women can be very determined, some may say stubborn but they know how much they can deal with and put up with. Understanding this and remembering if goals need to change, like the introduction of formula top ups, can be really upsetting to autistic mums but having research which they can read and study further can really help.

Some simple things like checking communication is going both ways, and finding strategies for coping, no matter how unusual they are can make a big difference to an autistic person’s breastfeeding journey.

Some links for more information and support:

The National Breastfeeding Helpline
Breastfeeding mums on the Autistic Spectrum Facebook page
Breastfeeding with a disability Facebook page
The Curly Hair Project
National Autistic Society – Autistic Women & Girls

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21 Mar

Breastfeeding and Down Syndrome: Information for Families & Breastfeeding Supporters

Breastfeeding a baby with Down syndrome can sometimes present challenges, but with the right information and support, many can breastfeed successfully. As part of World Down Syndrome Day, here we present two pieces from mothers of children with Down syndrome. First, Sarah gives her tips on successfully breastfeeding a baby with Down syndrome. Then Alice gives some pointers to those supporting families of children with Down syndrome.


Sarah is a BfN peer supporter and mother to Zephaniah. Here she gives her ten top tips for breastfeeding a baby with Down syndrome. You can read more of Sarah and Zephaniah’s story on Sarah’s blog, Chromosomes and Curls.

So you have decided you would like to breastfeed your baby. There are so many benefits in breastfeeding and these can apply even more so to babies with Down Syndrome. Breast milk can boost your babies immune system and provide protection against numerous auto-immune disorders such as celiac disease, allergies and asthma to name a few. The act of breastfeeding itself will strengthen your babies tongue, lips and face which helps with future speech development.

Sadly there is a myth that babies with Down Syndrome cannot breastfeed and I’ve heard many stories of mums not being supported or being told their baby won’t breastfeed so not to bother trying by various healthcare professionals.

Whilst it’s absolutely possible for many babies with Down Syndrome to breastfeed efficiently and successfully, there are some factors that may arise which can impact on establishing feeding. Medical complexities, low muscle tone and lack of suck, swallow, breathe co-ordination are some of the additional challenges facing babies with Down Syndrome. As a result some mums will breastfeed with expressed breastmilk from a bottle/tube and others will move onto formula milk.

I have been a breastfeeding helper with the BFN (the Breastfeeding Network) for around 5 years and Zephaniah, my baby with Down syndrome, is my second breastfed baby. I had a pre natal diagnosis and one of my major fears and concerns was whether I would be able to breastfeed. Thankfully I was surrounded by wonderfully supportive people who reassured me that it would be hopefully be possible! We had a slightly rocky start and I had to express almost exclusively for the first 3 weeks whilst bottle feeding and using an ng tube whilst we were in the special care unit and in the first week or so at home. Zephaniah is now four years old and breastfed until he was 2.5.

Here are my top tips! I would love for any other breastfeeding mums (or dads) to share any of their top tips in the comments.

1. Find your support during pregnancy
This is so important when pregnant with any baby. It’s something I learnt in hindsight after I had my first baby. The immediate post partum period can leave a woman feeling vulnerable, emotional, hormonal, physically in pain and sometimes the thought of trying to seek out where you can get support from can feel overwhelming. During pregnancy pop along to your local breastfeeding support group or La Leche League meeting and have a chat. Ask what support is available in hospital in the immediate post natal period. Have the breastfeeding helpline numbers to hand.

2. Colostrum Harvesting
Speak to your midwife about harvesting some colostrum in the last few weeks of pregnancy. This is expressing and collecting colostrum. They can show you a correct technique and provide you with syringes to collect the drops in. This will be beneficial in the early hours/days if your baby struggles to latch straight away or needs expressed milk/supplementation.

3. Donor Milk Policies
Talk to your hospital about their policies and availability of donor milk/milk bank if this is something you would prefer your baby to have over formula should you be required to supplement your baby with milk. Hospitals have different guideline that they follow so if you have something in place with them it will make things easier when the time comes.

4. Be prepared to pump
There are many reasons you may need to express breastmilk for your baby. It could be that your baby is struggling to latch or it could be due to a nicu/scbu stay, or baby being too sleepy to feed. If you baby has a heart condition or other medical issues going on then they might tire easily. Whilst you are in hospital you should be able to access a good hospital grade double pump. There are some companies that hire out hospital grade pumps at home or you can use a high street brand electric or manual pump. Some babies with Down Syndrome will breastfeed with no problems from the beginning, others, like any baby, may take longer to establish effective, successful feeding. Some mums will decide to pump exclusively for their babies for whatever timeframe they choose to. I pumped for around 3 weeks with Zephaniah before he was effectively feeding at the breast. I know a mum who pumped for 5 months before getting her son to feed directly at the breast.

5. Be wary of the phrase ‘It’s a Down Syndrome issue’
Don’t assume or allow anyone to dismiss problems you are facing as being ‘a Down Syndrome issue’. As a breastfeeding helper I have seen many women with typical babies facing all sorts of difficulties when establishing breastfeeding. Position and attachment, tongue tie, sleepy babies, being pushed into formula top ups, and mis information and awareness of typical newborn behaviour patterns are common reasons for struggling and all of these same things can apply to you and your baby with Down Syndrome as well as some additional challenges your babies may face. The main additional challenges your baby may face is difficulty latching and feeding due to low muscle tone, taking longer to establish a breathe, suck, swallow routine, being more sleepy or tiring easily. If your baby has complex medical issues such as a heart defect or anything else requiring surgery then there may be pressure for your baby to gain a certain amount of weight in a specific timeframe and sometimes this can make establishing breastfeeding a challenge.

6. Comfort and support
Low muscle tone in a baby can often make the baby feel heavier or floppy and more of a challenge to hold whilst breastfeeding. It’s important for your comfort, and your baby’s, that you are both well supported with good position and attachment. A suitable chair, a supportive breastfeeding pillow or your own cushions can help with this. Babies with low muscle tone will often brace their feet against something such as the arm of the chair to stabilise themselves and this can lead to arching which can impact on the positioning of the feeding. You may also want to give additional support to the babies head whilst making sure you aren’t restricting their movement.

7. Dancer Hand Position.
This is a technique that can assist when a baby has low muscle tone. You start by holding the breast in the C-hold (thumb on top and 4 fingers underneath) but support the breast with only 3 fingers leaving your index finger and thumb free to hold the baby’s cheek on either side, forming a U shape with the baby’s chin in the bottom of the U. This keeps the weight of the breast off the baby’s chin and helps keep the head steady. This can really help your baby to maintain a good latch. In the early days of feeding Zephaniah he really struggled to maintain a latch and without adequate chin support he would slip off the latch frequently. I would always have to feed him with a muslin cloth underneath as he leaked so much milk out of his mouth. As he got bigger and stronger so did his latch.

8. Skin to skin.
Make lots of time for skin to skin contact with your baby. This will help establish your milk supply and raise oxytocin levels. Whether you have a prenatal or post natal diagnosis, the immediate time after birth can often be traumatic and confusing. Your baby may be in the nicu or scbu where it can sometimes be more of a challenge to easily have skin to skin with your baby so it will need to be intentional. You may be feeling a variety of emotions and some mums may struggle to initially bond with their baby after having a surprise diagnosis. It’s normal to go through a range of emotions from sadness,to grief, to guilt, to anger and everything else in between. It’s also normal to not feel any negative emotions and have no issues with bonding, everyone is different and all feelings are normal.

9. Weight chart and red book.
In the UK all babies are issued with a red book at the hospital which contains medical information and growth charts/developmental information. Make sure you are given the green Down Syndrome insert which contains specific weight/growth charts as babies with Down syndrome can grow at a different/slower rate to typical children. Your baby may seem to be on a lower centile on the typical graph which can lead to some health care professionals recommending top ups of either expressed breast milk or formula when it’s unnecessary.

10. Go easy on yourself and enjoy your baby
Having a baby is a major event in anyone’s life and having a baby with additional needs adds an entirely different dimension on to that. Do what is best for you and your baby. Make informed choices. If you want to breastfeed and are struggling, try and find the right support and be patient as it can take time to establish.

If you are a mum who desperately wanted to breastfeed and have been unable to, know that you did your absolute best for your baby and you are amazing for giving it a go!


Alice works for the Portsmouth Down Syndrome Association, and is mother to Teddy. Here she writes about their experience, and gives some information on how best to sensitively support the families of children with Down syndrome on their breastfeeding journey.

I feel it’s important to start by explaining that I am not an expert in breastfeeding! I am a Social Worker and had chosen to specialise my career in working with people with Learning Disabilities. It wasn’t until my second son, Teddy was born, and then diagnosed with Down syndrome that I realised just how important and powerful language and knowledge is for everyone involved in supporting a family. I reached out to my local support group Portsmouth Down Syndrome Association (PDSA) when Teddy was diagnosed, and they supported my family from his diagnosis and throughout our journey to the cheeky 4-year-old he is now. I started to volunteer with PDSA and now provide education and training for Health and Social Care practitioners on all aspects of Down syndrome. It is important that families of people with Down syndrome have access to the support that they need and that this is delivered holistically.

Teddy was born by an elective c-section due to being breech. We had a blissful hour of skin to skin and Teddy was great at feeding, he latched straight away and ‘just got it’. After 24 hours in hospital recovering, both Teddy and I were discharged home (his diagnosis was missed) and we were eager to start life as a family of four. Teddy was brilliant at feeding and on day 3, we were rewarded with the fantastic news that he had gained 40g! However, Teddy’s subsequent weight gains were ‘static’, and he only gained 20g a day. Due to extended jaundice at 2-weeks-old we were seen in hospital by a doctor and consultant who suggested some screening and tests. I was grateful as had some feelings that all was not as expected with Teddy. One of these tests diagnosed Teddy as having polycythaemia (a high concentration of red blood cells in your blood). We were admitted to hospital the next day for ‘failure to thrive’. There was a suggestion that Teddy may be having difficulties getting milk, and that he may not manage with a bottle so would need a Nasogastric tube (NG). I was clear with the team that I wanted to continue breastfeeding, and so would express the ‘bottle top ups’ that they felt Teddy needed. As I had fed Teddy’s older brother successfully, I was quite confident in my ability to provide milk for him. I didn’t know what a NG tube was – but they weren’t doing that to my baby if we could avoid it!! We started the gruelling 3-hour cycle of alarms, feeding, expressing, and topping up. One nursery nurse was incredibly supportive. She sat next to me on the bed late in the evening and told me to ‘stand by my guns, and that if I wanted to feed, that I could and should’.

Slowly but surely, Teddy continued to gain weight, and so we were discharged 4 days later. At 3 weeks old, Teddy’s genetic bloodwork came back, and he was diagnosed with Down syndrome.

A few days later at a baby weigh clinic, I asked for support from a breastfeeding volunteer, I wanted to see if there was anything more I could do to help Teddy. I remember the volunteer asking my husband and I ‘how she could help’. It was the first time, that I had to tell anybody outside of our family, and health professionals that Teddy had Down syndrome. I was so very aware of the other mothers feeding their babies close by and found it difficult to speak. The volunteer was lovely and tried to support me but referred to Teddy as a ‘Downs baby’. I didn’t know how to tell her that Teddy’s diagnosis was only part of him – it didn’t define him. He was (and is) so much more than his diagnosis.

At home, we continued to ‘top’ Teddy up with expressed bottles of milk, but Teddy gained weight rapidly and so we limited these. Teddy was able to switch effortlessly between breastfeeding and bottle feeding – he wasn’t particularly bothered where his milk came from – as long as he had milk!

Breastfeeding was especially important to me. It gave Teddy and I a ‘closeness’, it helped me feel that despite a world of unfamiliar health appointments, invaded by complex health professionals and new medical language that I was doing something ‘important and normal’. Breastfeeding helped remind me that first and foremost, Teddy just needed love and milk- like all babies.

My tips to anyone supporting a family of a child with Down syndrome:

  • See the child first. Use positive, person first language, Teddy has Down syndrome rather than Down syndrome baby/child.
  • Congratulate that family on their newborn, as you would any baby – all babies deserve a warm welcome!
  • Signpost a family to resources like Julia’s way and their local Down syndrome support group for more guidance.
  • Encourage a family to advocate for how they wish to feed their child.
  • Many mothers of children with Down syndrome who had early issues report that their baby was breastfeeding successfully by 3-4 months of age.
  • Be aware that health conditions, a child’s tone or coordination may impact on their feeding, but different feeding positions may support baby better. For babies which may tire easily, it may help if milk let down happens before the baby latches. Ensure liaison with SLT if there are any concerns regarding aspiration.
  • Ensure that the family have a PCHR insert in their red book and so the baby is being plotted on a graph for children with Down syndrome.

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14 Dec

Christmastitis: look after yourself this holiday season

Although this Christmas is likely to be a little different, it’s still worth taking into account how you can maintain your feeding “routine” (even if it changes every day!) in among the celebrations. Mastitis is a potentially serious condition resulting from blocked ducts when milk isn’t effectively removed from the breast(s). Here, IBCLC Lucy Webber explains how changes in routine can affect your feeding rhythm – and makes some suggestions on how to avoid “Christmastitis.”
 
Did you know that rates of mastitis go up around holiday periods? Why? Well, loads of reasons to be honest. Let’s picture it shall we?
 
It’s your first christmas with your baby. You’re mega excited and so is everyone else to have this gorgeous bundle in their lives. Christmas is going to be AWESOME.
 
Lots of travelling around in the car visiting friends and family, making the most of maternity leave to see everyone and proudly show off this little person, taking up offers to go over and be cooked for! And that is genuinely fabulous.
But all that travelling leads to lots of time in the car seat, and for most babies the car seat sends them to sleep. And long sleeps mean long gaps between feeds, which leads to full breasts with potential for blockages…
 
Then the parties, the gatherings, celebrations! Lovely right?! Yes! Except everyone wants a hold of little baby Rupert and once again he has longer stretches between feeds. And when he does come back to you he’s over stimulated and over tired and only takes two minutes on the breast before he falls asleep leaving you with, you guessed it, full breasts….
 
Or the guests seem to think they know better than you do about baby Josie’s feeding cues and tell you she doesn’t need feeding, they can settle her for you. They talk about how ‘when they had babies you only fed every four hours and it didn’t do them any harm’. You’re then stuck between a rock and a hard place, because you would like to feed your baby, but you don’t want to upset family or the way they did things, and maybe they’re right?
 
Feeds are often cut short around celebrations, because you have lots of people offering to help and hold the baby so your dinner doesn’t go cold, or guests arrive, or you’re due somewhere, or you’re upstairs feeding and want to get back down to the party…the list goes on. So your breasts don’t get ’emptied’ like usual and can you guess what happens next? Yep….
 
Maybe you don’t feel comfortable feeding around Auntie Ethel and Uncle Bernard, so you don’t quite expose your breast as much as you might normally, and your clothes/bra are digging in a little and restricting milk flow and cause a blockage…
 
Maybe you’re sleeping somewhere different, the bed is different, you can’t quite get the angle of the feed right on this squishy mattress and the latch goes a bit dodgy, but you put up with it because you don’t want the baby to cry and wake everyone. Dodgy latch leads to breast not emptying efficiently…and you know the rest.
 
Christmas is lovely, but for a huge amount of people it’s also very stressful. Stress hormones can impact on oxytocin, which is the hormone needed to let your milk flow. So stress can temporarily inhibit milk flow leading to those full/blocked breasts again.
 
I might be coming across as a bit Bah, Humbug! but I’ve been around enough mothers with mastitis to know its REALLY not what you want to be dealing with at any point. It is not to be messed with, it is a serious condition and you can potentially end up very poorly.
 
What I’m saying is, take it EASY. Plan ahead now to make sure this holiday season is one where you can feed whenever and wherever you need to. Be led by your baby. Don’t stretch out or cut short feeds.
 
Listen to your body, not Auntie Denise.
 
 
You can find out more about mastitis, what to look out for and how to avoid it, in our factsheet here.
 
This post was originally published on Lucy Webber’s social media feeds and is reproduced here with her permission. You can find her on Facebook and Instagram.

12 Oct

Helen Ball: Sleep, Baby & You: development of a support intervention for UK families

Helen Ball has been researching the sleep of infants and their parents for 25 years. She conducts research in hospitals, the community, and her lab, and she contributes to national and international policy and practice guidelines on infant care. She is a Board Member of ISPID (the International Society for the Study and Prevention of Infant Deaths), Chair of the Scientific Committee for the Lullaby Trust, and Assessment Board member for Unicef UK Baby Friendly Initiative. In 2018 Durham University received the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Further and Higher Education for Helen’s research and outreach work.

In her talk at this year’s BfN Conference, Helen will provide an overview of her latest project to develop and trial a support intervention for parents who may be struggling with infant-related sleep disruption or post-partum fatigue. Here is a brief abstract of the project to whet your appetite!

Disrupted parental sleep, presenting as post-partum fatigue and perceived as problematic infant sleep, is related to increased symptoms of depression and anxiety among new mothers and fathers. Previous research indicates that UK parents would value an approach that facilitates meeting their infants’ needs while supporting their own sleep-related well-being throughout their infant’s first year.

Six initial stakeholder meetings were held with 15 practitioners and 6 parents with an interest in supporting parent-infant sleep needs, to explore existing service provision and identify gaps. The Possums Sleep Program, developed and delivered in Brisbane, Australia in a GP clinic setting, was chosen as an appropriate approach.

Working collaboratively with a stakeholder group, we translated the Possums Sleep Program into an intervention that could be universally delivered in the UK via NHS antenatal and postnatal practitioners. Parent and practitioner views of the initial materials were obtained via feedback questionnaires and the tool was revised. The intervention was then field-tested by 164 practitioners who delivered it to at least 535 new parents and babies over 5 UK locations, to capture anonymous parent and practitioner views of the intervention concept, the materials, and their experiences with both.

The intervention helps parents recalibrate their expectations of infant sleep development, encourages responsive parenting and experimentation to meet their infant’s needs, offers parents strategies for supporting the development of their babies’ biological sleep regulators and promote their own well-being, and teaches parents to manage negative thinking and anxiety that can impede sleep using the principles of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. The ‘Sleep, Baby & You’ discussion tool, a 14 page illustrated booklet for parents, was field-tested and evaluated by practitioners and parents who offered enthusiastic feedback.

Practitioners reported the ‘Sleep, Baby & You’ materials were easy for them to explain and for parents to understand, and were a good fit with the responsive parenting approaches they employed in other areas of their work. Parents who received the intervention postnatally understood the material and found the suggestions easy to follow. All parents who provided feedback had implemented one or more of the suggested changes, with the majority of changes (70%) being sustained for at least two weeks. Practitioners recommended development of digital and antenatal versions and offered feedback on circumstances that might challenge effective uptake of the intervention.

‘Sleep, Baby & You’ is a promising tool for promoting parental attitude and behaviour-change, that aims to adjust parental expectations and reduce negative thinking around infant sleep, promote responsive infant care in the face of infant-related sleep disruption and fatigue, and support parental well-being during the first year of parenthood. Initial field-testing provided insights useful for further development and subsequent testing via a randomised trial. Support exists for incorporating ‘Sleep, Baby & You’ into an anticipatory, universal intervention to support parents who may experience post-partum fatigue and infant sleep disruption.

 

Ready to hear more? Get your ticket for the conference here:
https://www.breastfeedingnetwork.org.uk/conference/

30 Sep

Dr Lisa J Orchard: The Impact of Social Media on Breastfeeding

Dr Lisa J. Orchard is a Senior Lecturer at The University of Wolverhampton. Lisa specialises in cyberpsychology and specifically the psychology behind social media use. Here she discusses the subject of her talk for our conference in October – the impact of social media on breastfeeding.

A recent trend on Tik Tok sees the reaction of breastfeeding infants and toddlers when shown the sight of their mother’s breast. Their eyes light up in glee, as they crawl or toddle over for a snuggle and feed. An adorable sight; but what are the implications of the clip being shared on social media? Perhaps the video will attract a series of likes, shares and comments. Will this make the mother feel supported and empowered? Will she receive any negative comments, which could be detrimental to her confidence? What happens when a teenage girl stumbles upon the video? Perhaps she’s never encountered breastfeeding before. Will this be a positive introduction to seeing how a baby is fed?

The hashtag “normalisebreastfeeding” has been used over the last decade across social media to counteract some of the negativities surrounding breastfeeding. This cyberactivism demonstrates that there was always a hope that social media could be used in a positive manner to benefit breastfeeding promotion and support. This makes sense – social media is our ‘go to’ when finding new information or looking for someone to talk to, which is exactly what new parents need. The “new normal” of COVID-19 has meant an even stronger reliance on technology than ever before. However, to make the most out of social media, we need to take stock of content in order to understand its effect. We also need to consider who is using social media, as this will determine what content is seen.

Let’s start with the breastfeeding mother, who may actively search for breastfeeding support groups and information pages. How does she decide what group to look at? What kind of information does she see? What does she find useful? How accurate is the information? Now let’s consider other users, who may only encounter breastfeeding incidentally, through the sharing of a newspaper article or the viewing of a breastfeeding social media influencer. How often do they encounter breastfeeding content? Do negative comments impact on their opinion of breastfeeding? Do they learn about the benefits of breastfeeding from infographics and memes shared by friends?

Dr Wendy Nicholls and I have embarked on a research project to try and answer some of these questions. In our first study we conducted a review of research already looking at social media and breastfeeding to see what has already been found. The research so far suggests that breastfeeding families enjoy social media and find it useful for information and support. However, social media support does not always result in improved breastfeeding rates. Within our research we consider why this may be and suggest that it could be due to the content being seen. From looking across the studies so far, we can make suggestions about ways to improve this content. For instance, it is important for breastfeeding mothers to feel that information is credible and trustworthy. Furthermore, having relatable role models is important. People want to see other people like them breastfeeding.

Our second study is looking at one specific type of content – the breastfeeding selfie, aka the brelfie! We have been interviewing breastfeeding mothers who share brelfies to better understand what mothers think about brelfies and why they feel they are important to share. By finding this information we can hopefully understand the impact of this content and think about how we can use them more effectively.

Social media undoubtedly poses risks for breastfeeding, and not all content will be positive. However, if we understand the types of content available and how they may impact perceptions of breastfeeding, we can work on improving positive content, and minimising the risk of negative content.

 

We look forward to hearing more at our virtual conference on 24th October. Got your ticket? Click here:
https://www.breastfeedingnetwork.org.uk/conference/

06 Aug

Breastfeeding support during COVID-19 – A summary report in collaboration with Professor Amy Brown (Swansea University) and Dr Natalie Shenker (Imperial College & Human Milk Foundation)   

In May 2020, researchers from Swansea University and Imperial College conducted research in collaboration with the Breastfeeding Network to explore families’ experiences of breastfeeding support during COVID-19. 

 

Click the image to read the full report:

Covid Report Thumbnail

 

The following summary has been taken from the report, the full findings will be published in a journal later this year.

COVID-19 and lockdown has been a challenging time for breastfeeding families. Many have stopped sooner than they planned. Although this is unfortunately a common issue even outside of the pandemic3, many blamed a lack of support and lockdown experiences upon their decision to stop. 

We know that breastfeeding works best when women receive high quality practical and emotional support from professionals and peers including in the community1. This support had to change once lockdown was in place, with breastfeeding charity organisations making rapid alterations to the way they delivered their service.  

Some women were fortunate to be able to access this, evidenced by the multiple, varied queries they had answered during this time, covering both practical and emotional support needs. The majority of those who accessed this support found it useful and wanted it to stay, albeit alongside the benefits of face to face support once possible. For these women, their experience was positive, giving them easy and rapid access to support from the comfort of their homes. Notably, some women accessed this support over and above health professional support during the pandemic. It is clear that breastfeeding organisations provided a valued and needed service at this time – a finding reflected in similar previous research exploring the impact of the Australian Breastfeeding Association during this time4

Unfortunately, two further groups of women did not have the benefit of this support including those who did not realise it was available, and those who accessed it but either struggled or had a strong preference for face to face provision. These women found a lack of in person care challenging, struggling to convey issues or with technology, or simply wanted the reassurance of someone in the room. It is likely these experiences are not equal; those with more resources and fewer challenges at home will find accessing different sources of support in during difficult times easier.  

We found that women who did access charity support when they needed it were more likely to still be breastfeeding at the time of completing the survey compared to those who did not. To some extent their ability and willingness to seek support will in itself have supported these mothers’ ability to continue breastfeeding, most likely reflecting high motivation. However, given what we know about the impact of breastfeeding support for new families1, the range of queries posed to teams, and the positive experiences from some women in this survey, it is evidence that charity breastfeeding organisations have played an important role in ensuring mothers could continue breastfeeding through lockdown.  

In terms of where we go from here, the good news is that online breastfeeding support services are working well for many women, helping them to breastfeed for longer. However, many challenges and questions have been set, with some of the answers likely outside the control or remit of organisations offering support. Namely: 

  • How do we ensure better promotion of availability of online breastfeeding support so that more families know they can access it? 
  • How do we ensure these organisations are well funded to be able to meet the needs of more women? 
  • How to we enable all populations to access online support, including those who may not be able to afford technology or high-speed internet connections? 
  • What is needed to recommence face to face breastfeeding support, given other public spaces such as restaurants and public spaces are open?  

Given the known impact of breastfeeding upon population health5 and maternal wellbeing6, the government urgently needs to review its provision of care for new families, considering how it can ensure that more are protected in similar circumstances in the future. Although almost all mothers valued the option to receive online or phone support during lockdown, many expressed a wish for face to face support to continue. Recent press reports have stated that Health Secretary Matt Hancock wishes to encourage future virtual GP appointments unless clinical need, but caution must be urged in relying too heavily on a lack of in person support. It was clear mothers valued both the information they were being given, but also the warmth and connection from face to face support, and engagement with other mothers.  

Finally, the impact of breastfeeding charities in supporting mothers practically and emotionally through this stressful period should be celebrated. They have served a community of new mothers, whom without their support may have had a much more challenging breastfeeding experience and likely a premature end to breastfeeding altogether. Their value and contribution must be recognised.  

 

References 

1.     McFadden, A., Gavine, A., Renfrew, M. J., Wade, A., Buchanan, P., Taylor, J. L., … & MacGillivray, S. (2017). Support for healthy breastfeeding mothers with healthy term babies. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (2). 

2.     Unicef UK (2020) Unicef UK Baby Friendly Initiative statement on infant feeding during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.  

3.     McAndrew, F., Thompson, J., Fellows, L., Large, A., Speed, M., & Renfrew, M. J. (2012). Infant feeding survey 2010. Leeds: health and social care information Centre2(1). 

4.     Hull, N., Kam, R. L., & Gribble, K. D. (2020). Providing breastfeeding support during the COVID-19 pandemic: Concerns of mothers who contacted the Australian Breastfeeding Association. medRxiv. [preprint] – doi 10.1101/2020.07.18.20152256  

5.     Victora, C. G., Bahl, R., Barros, A. J., França, G. V., Horton, S., Krasevec, J., … & Group, T. L. B. S. (2016). Breastfeeding in the 21st century: epidemiology, mechanisms, and lifelong effect. The Lancet, 387(10017), 475-490. 

6.     Brown, A. (2018). What do women lose if they are prevented from meeting their breastfeeding goals? Clinical Lactation9(4), 200-207. 

7.     BBC (2020) ‘More Zoom medicine needed’ in NHS says Hancock https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-53592678

 

Download the Summary Report in PDF

15 Nov

#MakingItWork – what if expressing doesn’t work for me?

Gemma Scott is a registered midwife and health visitor, and currently works for Plymouth City Council Public Health Team. Since her work focuses on children and young peoples’ health, she was familiar with some of the challenges she might face when returning to work as a breastfeeding mum – but what happens if you find it difficult to express milk when you’re away from your child? As she discovered, it needn’t spell the end of breastfeeding.

Some of the most common questions I see mothers asking about returning to work are,

How much breastmilk should I leave with my child?

How often should I pump?

I don’t have enough expressed breast milk, do I need to switch to formula?

My own experiences of returning to work whilst both my children were still feeding (around the clock!) and both around 9 months old, suggest these issues might not matter as much as you would think

Personally, I could never pump a huge amount of milk no matter how hard I tried. I have spent a whole week pumping a measly 100 mls for my daughter! And do you know how much of that precious liquid gold she drank? ZERO, choosing instead to have cups of water, solid food and cuddles with her nanny instead. I’ve tried, pumping and hand expressing religiously in office spaces, cafes, supermarkets, the car and everywhere else in between, terrified that my supply will dwindle whilst away from child, all to no avail. So, as you can gather, none of this stuff worked for me, …but something did, as we continued through our breastfeeding journey well into their toddler years.

Instead, I’ve learned that some good questions might be,

Who or what is my support system?

How can my support system adapt to support me on my return to work?

So, who or what was my support system? Well, it was completely a team effort and it began well before the babies came along.

Preparing my employer and particularly my immediate colleagues for the fact that I would be breastfeeding on my return to work was so important. The ‘what’ of course, was an HR policy which supported me as a breastfeeding mother – so do find yours and if there isn’t one, start asking some questions! Alongside this, during pregnancies I made sure that my work mates knew how important breastfeeding was to me, and how I might need to manage that on my return.  In my case I did make it very clear that I would need to go out of the office to either express or feed my baby during regular breaks.

I kept in touch with my colleagues during maternity leave.  I took opportunities to bring baby in to work to for events and occasional meetings when I could and so, my children became part of my work identity. I believe that this made it easier for my work system to adapt around me and be empathetic to my needs as a parent. I can recall a number of corporate events where I attended with baby in a sling, who was of course then passed continuously around everyone in the room. I mean, who doesn’t love a cuddle with a baby?!

Gemma and her baby at work.

It wasn’t only my employer who was prepared for the need to adapt and support us, but my partner’s also. By asking to flex his hours around our family well before baby arrived, he was able to work a shorter week and to be at home more as needed.  By being provided with the necessary IT and diary considerations, he was supported in supporting me. On his days at home if I wasn’t able to get away from the office for some reason, he would often bring baby to me for a breastfeed. Working in a fairly male dominated sector, he was initially reluctant to request this change to his schedule presuming that it would not be approved or, that it wouldn’t be a priority; but of course it was, so do ask!  

By also having additional childcare close to work, I was able to organise my day around visits for breastfeeds, never being further than a 5 minute drive away.  There were times when I would arrive and baby would be too busy to be interested in feeding, or fast asleep, but to arrive and see that they were happy and settled that was always good enough for me. It wasn’t long before myself and baby were ready to be separated for a little longer, but the transition felt like a process that we were both very much in control of.

Of course looking back, I was very lucky! I had good relationship with my employer, as did my husband. We had childcare from someone we knew and trusted. We had choices. I know unfortunately that this is not the case for lots of families, but some of the questions we asked and the steps we put in place, might be just a bit easier than the challenges women like me face with pumping, storing milk and being physically away from baby for the day.

We know that given the right support baby and mum will adapt around each other, it’s actually up to everyone around us to make sure it happens.

To read more about Making It Work, BfN’s campaign for breastfeeding mothers returning to work or study, click the image below:

12 Nov

Guest post: Emma Pickett on returning to work as a breastfeeding mum

As part of our #MakingItWork campaign, Emma Pickett (IBCLC and chair of the Association of Breastfeeding Mothers) gives her take on the process of returning to work as a breastfeeding mum – from the practical to the more emotional aspects.

The first few weeks are often a blur for new mums. The learning curve is steep and you survive day to day – remembering to shower and put food in the fridge for yourself if you are lucky. For those mums still in the middle of that blur, the thought of the eventual return to work can be one that provokes anxiety.

You can’t imagine how it will feel to leave this new special person in your life.

How do you people cope with drop-offs to childcare and getting back to work after potentially several night-wakings?

What do you do if you don’t want to give up breastfeeding?

As a breastfeeding counsellor and lactation consultant, I’ve been supporting breastfeeding mums on their return to work for the last 6 years and there are a few things that are worth bearing in mind.

Here are my SIX top tips for returning to work as a breastfeeding mum.

1.       Don’t think about it.

OK, now I don’t mean that too literally. My message is just that if you are going to take 6 months, 8 months or a year off work and you spend several months of that stressing about the return to work, you will be seriously missing out.

STOP yourself thinking about it too much. If you stare at your gorgeous three month old and think fleetingly, “How can I ever leave you?” (which is how nature very much wants you to feel), that is fair enough. But if you spend chunks of your maternity leave feeling anxious and worrying about practicalities, you will be wasting the special times you do have together.

This time is precious. Your baby now is not going to be the same person when you return back to work. They will sleep differently, feed differently, and interact differently. You will not be leaving THIS baby but an older one.  So get your childcare sorted (which you may well have thought about in pregnancy anyway) and other than that, there’s not too much more to do! If you intend to express milk at work, it’s a good idea to write to your employer about 2 months before you go back to work to talk about arrangements. And then just carry on as normal. If your 4 month old baby won’t take a bottle and that starts you panicking because you have to go back to work at 8 months, don’t think about it. An 8 month old baby can breastfeed when you are with them in the morning and evening, take a sippy cup, drink from an open cup – you will have options. And a four month old baby that refuses a bottle may not if you try again after leaving it for a few weeks. It’s very easy to set yourself into a panic when the truth is that things usually work out with the right information and the right support.

2.       As mentioned, speak to your employer.

http://www.hse.gov.uk/mothers/faqs.htm#q14

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/Pages/breastfeeding-back-to-work.aspx

The recommendation is that you inform them that you will be returning to work as breastfeeding mum so they have a chance to assess your health and safety and what provisions you may need. Your employers are required to keep you safe. They also have a legal requirement to allow you to ‘rest’ as a breastfeeding mother. Sadly, in the UK, there is not a clearly established legal right to express breastmilk at work and it’s important you talk to your employer so they have advanced warning and you can come to an arrangement. Some women need to have break times re-organised or a room found. Although there is no ‘legal right’ the VAST majority of employers understand that it is in their interests to try and meet your needs and provide you with facilities. Your morale matters and a baby receiving breastmilk is less likely to suffer from illness meaning less time off work for you. There are health and safety executive recommendations and many employers understand the benefits of supporting you as much as possible. However, employers will be more likely to be accommodating if you give them warning and explain your needs clearly.

3.       Talk through your schedule with a breastfeeding counsellor or lactation consultant.

Drop-ins are not just for people with problems with positioning and attachment. It’s really common for a mum to come along a few weeks before their return to work to talk about how they hope to organise their feeding and pumping schedule and how to organise things practically. I’ve included some typical scenarios later on.

4.       Practise pumping.

Is the breast pump you are using a home something you are familiar with? Do you have a backup if you need to pump at work? Is it worth sourcing a double pump if time is an issue or even hiring a hospital grade electric breast pump for a few months which can just stay at work? You’d be looking at paying around £45 a month (http://www.ardobreastpumps.co.uk/breastpumps_for_hire)

There are tricks such as preparing the breast using massage and warm compresses. And we know that women who finish a pumping session using hand expression techniques can increase their output considerably.

http://lllrochester.weebly.com/uploads/7/9/5/4/795404/marmet_technique_tearoff.pdf

It’s also not a bad idea to build up a bit of a freezer stash before you go back. If you start pumping for one extra session each day and storing that in a freezer bag (store them flat and build up layers of thin flat bags which defrost more easily and take up less space), you will have some wiggle room if you need it. It’s not entirely predictable how pumping will go at work and some women find that their pumping output decreases towards the end of the week and then a weekend of normal breastfeeding boosts it back up again. If you have that freezer stash, it will take away some of their anxiety.

5.       Get your kit.

So you need a pump and some bottles and some breastmilk storage bags. What else? Surprisingly not much. You don’t need to store freshly expressed breastmilk in the fridge at work if you don’t want to. You can have a freezer block and an insulated bag and put any expressed milk in there. It is fine in that for 24 hours. So if you store it like that at work, put it in the fridge when you get home, then that milk can be given to your baby’s carer for the next day.

https://www.breastfeedingnetwork.org.uk/breastfeeding-help/expressing-storing/

It’s also really important to note, you don’t need to wash and sterilise the pump between pumping sessions. Breastmilk is fine at room temperature for up to 6 hours. So you certainly don’t need to wash a pump between your 11am pumping session and your 2pm one. Lots of working mums use a technique called ‘wet-bagging’, putting a pump in a plastic bag between sessions and then putting it back in the fridge. Then simply take it out next time and wipe any wet parts with paper kitchen towel if you don’t fancy cold drips against you! This also saves precious time.

6.       Breastfeed when you can.

Your supply is more likely to be maintained if you breastfeed when you get the chance. Is your childcare near work or home? Could you visit your baby at lunchtime?  Could you work from home for one day a week for the first few weeks? You could breastfeed early in the morning, then once more at drop-off, once more at pick-up and again at home later in the evening. Those 4 feeds would be enough breastmilk overall for a baby of 8 months or more. You may not need to be carrying bottles back and forth. And breastfeeding at the weekends and during holidays will help to boost your supply.

Here are the stories of three mothers I have supported (names and some details have been changed):

Carla is going back to work full-time at 6 months. Her son is an enthusiastic exclusive breastfeeder and she’d like to avoid using formula if she can. When her son is 4 months old, she writes to her boss (she is a PA in a law firm) and explains she would like to express her milk at work. Her boss explains the company procedure of having a small office set aside for pumping and there is also a fridge available. Carla explains she intends to express around 3 times in the working day and one of those times will be during her lunch break. Her boss is fine with that. She has a double electric pump which she starts using from 4 months and she gives her son a bottle every other day to get him used to it. She finds he prefers to sit a bit more upright and usually takes 3-4oz from the bottle.

She starts solids around 10 days before she goes back to work and he takes small amounts initially and Carla knows his breastfeeding schedule will remain unaffected for a while. The week before she starts work, they visit the nursery together and he has a few hours there. He then has two trial days where Carla practises her expressing schedule and the nursery workers give him a bottle and some solids.

On her working day, she breastfeeds him as normal at 6am. She drops him off at nursery at 7.45am and offers again and he takes a small feed. At work she expresses at 11am, 1.30pm and 3.30pm. She collects her son from nursery at 6pm. He is keen to breastfeed when she arrives and they breastfeed at nursery. She breastfeeds him again at home at around 10pm as a dreamfeed.  He wakes once at around 2am and she breastfeeds him again.

While he is at nursery, the carers give him bottles and offer solids and he usually takes around 12oz in total while they are separated. As he has 3 good breastfeeds in addition to that in 24 hours, Carla isn’t worried. Carla expresses more milk at work than her son takes in a bottle at the moment. Over the next few weeks, she moves to expressing only twice. Carla ends up offering exclusive breastmilk until 12 months and then she gradually introduces cow’s milk.

Phoebe is returning to work at 10 months. She is a graphic designer and works from home with some client visits necessary around London. Her daughter breastfeeds around 4 times in 24 hours and enjoys solids which she started at 6 months. Phoebe doesn’t enjoy pumping and finds it difficult so would rather avoid it if possible. She finds a child-minder who lives near her home. Phoebe breastfeeds at 8.30am and drops her daughter at the child-minder. If she is working from home she visits at lunchtime for another breastfeed. She then collects her daughter at around 4pm and takes her home to breastfeed at 6pm and around 11pm. While her daughter is at the child-minder, she eats solid food and drinks water. The child-minder doesn’t give her milk. When Phoebe has a client visit, she sometimes hand expresses for a few minutes into a plastic bag when she can grab a private moment. This is just to stay comfortable when she feels particularly engorged. This will help to reduce her risk of blocked ducts and mastitis and help to maintain her supply. She doesn’t keep the milk. Phoebe continues breastfeeding her daughter until she is 18 months old. At the end she is only breastfeeding in the morning and evening and Phoebe doesn’t feel the need to use any hand expression when they are separated.

Catherine is returning to work at 8 months. Her son breastfeeds around 6 times in 24 hours. He started solids at 6 months. He doesn’t particularly like bottles and usually only takes around 2oz max. Catherine finds that he will take more milk from an open cup called a doidy cup. He will also more likely to take it if she mixes the breastmilk with ripe banana and makes a smoothie! Catherine gets through a lot of bananas! She works 4 days a week (and at 12 months will go back to being full time). Catherine is a teacher. Her headteacher has struggled to find her a private room for pumping but has given her the key to the medical room and if that is in use, she uses a stock cupboard and she has told staff that when her scarf is on the door, please knock! Usually the medical room is empty. Her colleagues have agreed to relieve her of playground duty while she is breastfeeding. She breastfeeds her son at 5.45am and again at 7.45am at the child-minder. She arrives at school at 8.15am. She expresses at 10.45am during morning break. She expresses for 10 minutes. She expresses again at lunchtime for 15 minutes and at around 4pm for another 10 minutes. She has to use a double pump as her pumping time is restricted. She remains at school for meetings and lesson preparation and collects her son at around 6pm. She breastfeeds him at 7pm and 10pm. He wakes to feed between 1-2am and Catherine is happy for that to continue for the time being as he feeds and goes back to sleep quickly.

With the child-minder, her son takes around 3oz of breastmilk in his smoothie, 2oz mixed into a porridge and another 1-2oz from his doidy cup. She also makes sure his solids contain good sources of fats and calcium. Sometimes she struggles to pump in her breaks as she really needs to continue working. She finds herself dipping into her freezer stash and as time goes on, the child-minder sometimes uses formula to make up the porridge. On the weekends and on her day off, he breastfeeds more frequently.  

There are many women who effortlessly combine breastfeeding and working. If it sounds hard, remember that in the USA there is no statutory maternity leave and women often return to work after just a few weeks. However they have 16% of babies exclusively receiving breastmilk at 6 months and the UK manages 1% (http://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/pdf/2012BreastfeedingReportCard.pdf).

Working and breastmilk are not incompatible. With modern electric breast pumps and using breastfeeding support available locally and through the National Breastfeeding Helpline, it’s never been easier. However if we could get the statutory right to pump at work it would certainly help. Contact your MP if you feel the right to express at work (as exists in 92 countries throughout the world) is something UK mums should be entitled to.

This article was originally published on Emma’s blog, here, and is reproduced here with her permission.

To read more about Making It Work, BfN’s campaign for breastfeeding mothers returning to work or study, click the image below:

03 Jul

Guest Post: Ruth Dennison, Black Mothers and Breastfeeding

Ruth Dennison will be giving a presentation at our conference in October, entitled “Supporting Black women who breastfeed”. In this guest blog, she explains why it’s so important to support women in the black community to breastfeed, and how their needs may be different to those from other ethnicities or cultures.

Everyday a mother gives birth. Everyday a mother would attempt to breastfeed her newborn.

Everyday a mother successfully breastfeeds her baby and everyday a mother struggles to breastfeed her baby.

Why is this important, because in my 12 years of supporting mothers with breastfeeding, the rates of mothers reaching out for support in the Black community is very low, why is this?

Do you know breastfeeding support is more likely to be effective if it is proactive, delivered face to face and provided on an ongoing basis.

Why do Black mothers feel that they are just supposed to get it right on their own or supplement with artificial milk, do you know that within the Black community most expectant mothers have already been told or have told themselves that breastfeeding is not always possible and that they may need to top up their baby.  So what do they do, they buy formula milk and bottles just in case they have breastfeeding difficulties.  Black mothers, do you know this is not the best solution and definitely not your only solution.  Learning about breastfeeding antenatally is the best approach to help you get breastfeeding off to the best start.  Yes, there are many books, videos, courses and workshops to help you get off to the best start and this is needed more than ever as the Black community’s health is being affected by this.

Think…..If formula milk is just as good as breast milk, there would be no need for me to write this blog, no need for breastfeeding advocates, UNICEF and WHO trying to get the world to breastfeed their babies with something which is biologically made for their babies, the most natural food for your baby.  You know, when I have spoken to some Black mothers about breastfeeding, they have many reasons why to stop breastfeeding but not many reason why they want to continue breastfeeding up to and beyond 6 months as recommended.  Many Black mothers offer their babies solid food from around 3-4 months (Read when experts say babies are ready for solid food: here), why is this, is it because of family and culture influences or is it because you don’t see other women who look like you breastfeeding much more than 6 weeks.  Do you feel like you will be negatively judged? Is it the lack of support, social or media pressure?  Did you want or need extra support but wasn’t sure where to go? What is your reason why?

Have you ever asked your parents what they remember about breastfeeding. There are so many different stories and 2 of the popular reasons is that they either suffered in pain and swear never to put themselves through it again or that they believe that they never had enough milk.  Just my note to you, most of the time if you feel pain and have sore nipples/breast while breastfeeding, it is very likely that your baby wasn’t latched on correctly which can cause pain and with your baby not being latched on correctly your milk supply can drop, if you mix feed your baby this can also cause your milk supply to drop.  Over 90% of women can exclusively breastfeed their babies successfully with good support, encouragement and reassurance.  Breastfeeding is a skill that mother and baby are learning together and each day won’t always be the same but one thing is that you shouldn’t have sore nipples and if you do, you should consider getting support to help you breastfeed your baby comfortable.

How much do you know about breastfeeding? It would be good to know, because when I have spoken to families about breastfeeding they are amazed with the knowledge I share with them.

These links below can give you an idea of the breastfeeding rates in Africa and the caribbean which also have details on how many babies lives can be saved with improved breastfeeding rates.
Caribbean fails to fully meet recommend standards for breastfeeding.
The Wellbeing Foundation Africa is urging all mothers to breastfeed infants exclusively until they are at least 6 months old.

To hear more from Ruth, book tickets to our conference here: http://www.breastfeedingnetwork.org.uk/conference/

This post has been reproduced from Ruth’s blog, and was originally published here:
https://www.121doula.co.uk/breastfeeding/black-mothers-and-breastfeeding/