24 Aug

Guest Blog by Ruth Dennison – Why Black Breastfeeding Week?

Ruth Dennison
Ruth Dennison is a Doula and breastfeeding supporter in London.  She has kindly shared this blog with us to celebrate the first ever Black Breastfeeding Week in the UK.  The original version of this blog can be found here.

.
Black Breastfeeding Week starts 25th – 31st August, we will celebrating Black Breastfeeding Week for the first time in the UK.

 .
There has been a look into what has been happening in the breastfeeding community of black families.  It has been documented in the UK showing that black women have the highest breastfeeding rates of 1-3% .  Many are questioning this, as there are many factors within the black community which causes black women to not exclusively breastfeed their babies until 6 months and beyond as recommended by UNICEF and WHO.  Evidence shows that Black families suffer the highest infant mortality in the UK and it is strongly believed breastfeeding could help reduce the numbers.  Breastfeeding/breastmilk have countless health benefits for mother and child, it can help prevent many illnesses, infections, diseases and reduce the risk of SIDS (Sudden infant death syndrome).
 .
In the black community it is very common for mothers to offer their babies alternatives from early, 2-4months, if not earlier.  The top on the list is introducing water, why? because baby has a bad tummy.  Black families have a culture of introducing solid foods from as early as 3- 4 months, why? because their milk is not satisfying baby, because baby is looking at the dinner plate and trying to grab the food off, she is now ready to eat, because granny said baby keeps crying, because your breast milk is not enough, mum needs to rest and let someone else feed baby (this can be done with expressed breast milk and breastfeeding actually makes mothers have to sit their busy bodies down, bond, heal and nurture their babies while they rest), because you never knew what to expect, because no one told you, because you never had any breastfeeding support, because breastfeeding is painful (which it should not be).  I would say I have listed a good few things on why many black women don’t exclusively breastfeed their babies in the early stages of their babies life and there is so much more to this which will be high lighted at the “Why Black Breastfeeding Week?” event.
 .
Do you know there is a history of breastfeeding trauma which has passed down through generations in the black community, this may still be hindering breastfeeding in the black community today, many black women tend to not seek breastfeeding education, they tend to listen to their family elders, especially grandparents, as they are placed as the veterans in parenting.  Learn more about the history of breastfeeding trauma within the black community here: Slavery, Wet-Nursing, and Black
 .
This table below shows research on the reasons why breastfeeding mothers in the Caribbean introduce supplements to their babies, this also effects black mothers in the UK.
The most common reason was that water was given as it was felt the babies were too hot, baby was constipated or have grip (wind), to wash baby’s tongue, to settle baby, supplements were started in the hospital nursery or when mothers was ill, to prevent baby getting gas from the breastmilk, or on doctor’s orders.
 .
How many black women do you see in your local community breastfeeding support groups?
A qualitative study of baby cafe services was carried out in the UK, within this it states, older, more highly educated mothers are more likely to seek help with breastfeeding difficulties.  Which ethnicity/colour do you think these mothers are?
 .
I do get a lot of hate when I speak on colour and breastfeeding, especially on my BBW Youtube video I made last year, it did get to me to begin with but now I do not worry about the negative comments, because those who don’t want to learn about the issues which lay in the black breastfeeding community, don’t really care and to be honest that is life, you can’t please everyone no matter how much you try.  BBW is not a race war, it is a call for action as evidence show black babies die at a higher rate than any other race.
 .
Yes, we all know the world needs major improvements in breastfeeding, but when working within breastfeeding, noticing how badly this is effecting the black community more than any other race, it is only right that someone waves the red flag and alerts the UK breastfeeding community.
 .
Yes, black mothers may have a higher initiation of breastfeeding, but it is also very common for black mothers to introduced their babies to alternatives from early days, weeks and months due to culture influences, social pressures and lack of skilled breastfeeding support.
 .
Here I have attached a link of 3 black breastfeeding mothers stories, with hope that you see it through the mothers eyes.
 .
There are many risk factors contributing to infant mortality such as birthweight, mother’s age at birth of child, and the parents’ socio-economic status, some of these same factors are also what contributes to the high drop off breastfeeding rates in the black community.
 .
Black African origin in the UK, had the highest infant mortality rate at 54.1 deaths per 1,000 live births, you can learn more here.
 .
Black Breastfeeding week isn’t just an issue in USA, it is an issue in the UK and other parts of the world.
My name is Ruth Dennison, I am a Doula who specialises in breastfeeding.  I have been supporting families in breastfeeding since 2007 in the NHS and privately.
 .
On Friday August 31st 2018, I will be hosting the ‘Why Black Breastfeeding Week’ event,  because many don’t understand why we need it and it is important for families, breastfeeding practitioners and organisations to learn the reasons why.  When we learn the reasons why, is when we can then help make a change, help reduce infant mortality and better the health within the black community as evidence shows breastfeeding has long term health benefits for mother and child and this lengthens the longer you breastfeed.
 .
After speaking with Kimberly Seals Allers Author of The Big Letdown and Mars Lord from Abuela Doulas, at the Birth and Breastfeeding While Black UK event, it made me more determined to host this event.  I know it may not be everyone’s cup of tea but neither is it mine when I know how much improvements need to be made for black families and breastfeeding.
 .
Together we can make a change!
Event Information

Event Information

“Why Black Breastfeeding Week?” event coming Friday 31st August 2018, learn more or purchase tickets here.

24 Aug

Guest Post by Ruth Dennison – Why Black Breastfeeding Week?

Ruth Dennison
Ruth Dennison is a Doula and breastfeeding supporter in London.  She has kindly shared this blog with us to celebrate the first ever Black Breastfeeding Week in the UK.  The original version of this blog can be found here.

.
Black Breastfeeding Week starts 25th – 31st August, we will celebrating Black Breastfeeding Week for the first time in the UK.

 .
There has been a look into what has been happening in the breastfeeding community of black families.  It has been documented in the UK showing that black women have the highest breastfeeding rates of 1-3% .  Many are questioning this, as there are many factors within the black community which causes black women to not exclusively breastfeed their babies until 6 months and beyond as recommended by UNICEF and WHO.  Evidence shows that Black families suffer the highest infant mortality in the UK and it is strongly believed breastfeeding could help reduce the numbers.  Breastfeeding/breastmilk have countless health benefits for mother and child, it can help prevent many illnesses, infections, diseases and reduce the risk of SIDS (Sudden infant death syndrome).
 .
In the black community it is very common for mothers to offer their babies alternatives from early, 2-4months, if not earlier.  The top on the list is introducing water, why? because baby has a bad tummy.  Black families have a culture of introducing solid foods from as early as 3- 4 months, why? because their milk is not satisfying baby, because baby is looking at the dinner plate and trying to grab the food off, she is now ready to eat, because granny said baby keeps crying, because your breast milk is not enough, mum needs to rest and let someone else feed baby (this can be done with expressed breast milk and breastfeeding actually makes mothers have to sit their busy bodies down, bond, heal and nurture their babies while they rest), because you never knew what to expect, because no one told you, because you never had any breastfeeding support, because breastfeeding is painful (which it should not be).  I would say I have listed a good few things on why many black women don’t exclusively breastfeed their babies in the early stages of their babies life and there is so much more to this which will be high lighted at the “Why Black Breastfeeding Week?” event.
 .
Do you know there is a history of breastfeeding trauma which has passed down through generations in the black community, this may still be hindering breastfeeding in the black community today, many black women tend to not seek breastfeeding education, they tend to listen to their family elders, especially grandparents, as they are placed as the veterans in parenting.  Learn more about the history of breastfeeding trauma within the black community here: Slavery, Wet-Nursing, and Black
 .
This table below shows research on the reasons why breastfeeding mothers in the Caribbean introduce supplements to their babies, this also effects black mothers in the UK.
The most common reason was that water was given as it was felt the babies were too hot, baby was constipated or have grip (wind), to wash baby’s tongue, to settle baby, supplements were started in the hospital nursery or when mothers was ill, to prevent baby getting gas from the breastmilk, or on doctor’s orders.
 .
How many black women do you see in your local community breastfeeding support groups?
A qualitative study of baby cafe services was carried out in the UK, within this it states, older, more highly educated mothers are more likely to seek help with breastfeeding difficulties.  Which ethnicity/colour do you think these mothers are?
 .
I do get a lot of hate when I speak on colour and breastfeeding, especially on my BBW Youtube video I made last year, it did get to me to begin with but now I do not worry about the negative comments, because those who don’t want to learn about the issues which lay in the black breastfeeding community, don’t really care and to be honest that is life, you can’t please everyone no matter how much you try.  BBW is not a race war, it is a call for action as evidence show black babies die at a higher rate than any other race.
 .
Yes, we all know the world needs major improvements in breastfeeding, but when working within breastfeeding, noticing how badly this is effecting the black community more than any other race, it is only right that someone waves the red flag and alerts the UK breastfeeding community.
 .
Yes, black mothers may have a higher initiation of breastfeeding, but it is also very common for black mothers to introduced their babies to alternatives from early days, weeks and months due to culture influences, social pressures and lack of skilled breastfeeding support.
 .
Here I have attached a link of 3 black breastfeeding mothers stories, with hope that you see it through the mothers eyes.
 .
There are many risk factors contributing to infant mortality such as birthweight, mother’s age at birth of child, and the parents’ socio-economic status, some of these same factors are also what contributes to the high drop off breastfeeding rates in the black community.
 .
Black African origin in the UK, had the highest infant mortality rate at 54.1 deaths per 1,000 live births, you can learn more here.
 .
Black Breastfeeding week isn’t just an issue in USA, it is an issue in the UK and other parts of the world.
My name is Ruth Dennison, I am a Doula who specialises in breastfeeding.  I have been supporting families in breastfeeding since 2007 in the NHS and privately.
 .
On Friday August 31st 2018, I will be hosting the ‘Why Black Breastfeeding Week’ event,  because many don’t understand why we need it and it is important for families, breastfeeding practitioners and organisations to learn the reasons why.  When we learn the reasons why, is when we can then help make a change, help reduce infant mortality and better the health within the black community as evidence shows breastfeeding has long term health benefits for mother and child and this lengthens the longer you breastfeed.
 .
After speaking with Kimberly Seals Allers Author of The Big Letdown and Mars Lord from Abuela Doulas, at the Birth and Breastfeeding While Black UK event, it made me more determined to host this event.  I know it may not be everyone’s cup of tea but neither is it mine when I know how much improvements need to be made for black families and breastfeeding.
 .
Together we can make a change!
Event Information

Event Information

“Why Black Breastfeeding Week?” event coming Friday 31st August 2018, learn more or purchase tickets here.

31 Jul

BfN Statement on Channel 4 Dispatches Programme 30/07/2018 – Breastfeeding Uncovered

Dispatches presenter breastfeeding her baby

Dispatches presenter Kate Quilton

Negative cultural attitudes towards breastfeeding are common place in the UK and often this is reinforced by media messages.

However, last night’s Dispatches programme demonstrated sensitive and robust journalism on the emotive and polarised issue that is breastfeeding.

The Breastfeeding Network is a charity that supports women and families in their choice to breastfeed in a culture that often treats women negatively for pursuing an unpopular choice.

The programme highlighted the progress that science and medical experts have made in acknowledging the make-up of breastmilk and the impact breastfeeding can have on infant and maternal health. It also looked at the marketing of breastmilk substitutes and how much care has to be taken to ensure breastfeeding is not undermined in health care settings. The lack of evidence-base for formula products’ claims to resolve sleep and colic problems is clearly misleading parents, exploiting families’ tight financial budgets and failing to resolve the problem.

The programme also highlighted the shocking truth that investment in health even where the evidence-base is strong does not always follow, nor can it compete with a multi-billion pound industry that seeks to dominate the choices of parents and families. Protection and scaling up of breastfeeding can only be truly tackled where we work together to create the environment to enable women and their families to choose it.

The programme spoke directly with breastfeeding women and allowed them to voice their concerns around the lack of support for breastfeeding – an issue that BfN are all too aware of – many of our face-to-face peer support services have seen significant cuts in recent months and years, meaning many families are no longer able to access good quality peer support in their local areas.

Many women featured in the programme also spoke out about their concerns around breastfeeding in public.  Many women tell us that they worry about feeding out and about, feeling intimidated and worried about being treated negatively. The presenter Kate Quilton said she sometimes felt like a ‘social outcast’ – women tell us this all the time and that is why having peers in your community to support you is so critical for many women.

We were pleased to see the portrayal of the issues and the balanced journalism presented by Dispatches that reinforces the high quality evidence in the field of infant feeding helps us to continue to change the conversation around breastfeeding and move to its normalisation, so that more parents can feel they can choose to breastfeed.

If you are affected by any of the issues raised please contact the National Breastfeeding Helpline on 0300 100 0212 – open 9.30am-9.30pm 365 days a year.

The programme is available for 30 days on C4 catch up.  If you only do one thing to celebrate World Breastfeeding Week, please share this link with your local councillor and MP.

17 May

BfN Position statement on APPG on Obesity report May 2018

On 15th May the All Party Parliamentary Group on Obesity launched its report on the current landscape of obesity services.

Front+page+of+obesity report

 
With overweight and obesity costs in the UK estimated to be at least 27 billion every year and recent headline news that obesity is poised to overtake smoking as a key cause of cancer it is no wonder that national leaders are championing for change’, said Shereen Fisher, CEO of Breastfeeding Network who attended the event in Parliament.

 
She said, ‘We agree with the report’s key recommendation that “A national obesity strategy for both adult and childhood obesity should be developed and implemented by the Government, with input from key stakeholders. This should look to strengthen existing services and replicate best practice across the country. However we were disappointed to see there is no mention of how babies are fed anywhere in the report despite recognising “One in five children are already overweight or obese before they start school”’.

 
There is a wealth of evidence about the importance of breastfeeding, support for responsive bottle feeding and timing of starting solid food and the difference this can make to both child and maternal obesity levels.

 
A full list of studies related to obesity and breastfeeding can be found on the Unicef Baby Friendly site here (infant health): https://www.unicef.org.uk/babyfriendly/news-and-research/baby-friendly-research/infant-health-research/infant-health-research-obesity/ and here (maternal health): https://www.unicef.org.uk/babyfriendly/news-and-research/baby-friendly-research/maternal-health-research/maternal-health-research-obesity/

 

The Obesity report recognises that: “There needs to be a co-ordinated, whole-system approach to the prevention of obesity at both the local and national level considering the impact of the environments in which people live, including the total household income, as well as the amount and type of food they consume.” and so there is clearly understanding that how infants and children are fed has both an immediate and long term effect on their health.
With the role of the Obesity APPG being to consider prevention through to treatment for obesity it is vital that the evidence for nutrition and the role that breastfeeding plays is considered and understood. The long awaited SACN (Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition) draft report ‘Feeding in the First Year of Life’ will provide important review of the evidence affecting nutrition useful for the work of the APPG on Obesity.

Last year the Government published its childhood obesity strategy. The top line in this was the soft drinks industry levy. The Breastfeeding Network would like to see the Government go further in taking action to implement the recommendations of the Obesity APPG AND include evidence and support for breastfeeding which will go a long way to support better health outcomes for women and children regardless of their backgrounds.

With the effects of obesity disproportionately centred on poorer children and families the important role of breastfeeding, which offers the same health and emotional benefits to all babies regardless of background, needs important attention in any future obesity strategy that cares about narrowing inequalities‘ says Shereen.

 
While focus on the problem of pervasive junk food advertising at children and families is important we must not ignore the role of early years nutrition from pregnancy and beyond. As a recent tweet said ‘…the problem of obesity begins long before a child is able to eat crisps’.

22 Nov

Westminster 20th anniversary celebration

On the evening of Tuesday 14th November 2017, BfN volunteers, staff members, friends and MPs from across the country gathered together in Westminster to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Breastfeeding Network. We heard from a number of speakers, including Sharon Hodgson MP, Francesca Entwhistle from Unicef Baby Friendly, as well as from our CEO Shereen Fisher and some of our brilliant volunteers.
You can read the transcripts of Shereens speech, plus our volunteers, Marion and Gosia here.