15 Nov

A list of MPs who came to our 20th anniversary reception in Parliament

The infant feeding APPGThank you for inviting your MP to come to our 20th birthday reception in Parliament last night and the Infant Feeding APPG yesterday afternoon. Here is a list of all the MPs who came.

If your MP is on either list, please do thank them for coming along, consider following up with them by inviting them to come along to a drop in group (if you feel it’s appropriate) or meet with them to discuss issues around infant feeding in your area. Having a relationship with your MP really does help in campaigning for better breastfeeding support services.

At our 20th anniversary parliamentary reception the following MPs were there:

  • Alison Thewliss – SNP MP for Glasgow Central
  • David Linden – SNP MP for Glasgow East
  • Sharon Hodgson – Labour MP for Washington and Sunderland West
  • Mohammed Yasin – Labour MP for Bedford
  • Mike Gapes – Labour and Co-operative MP for Ilford South
  • George Hollingberry – Conservative MP for Meon Valley
  • Steve McCabe – Labour MP for Birmingham, Selly Oak
  • Stephen Morgan – Labour MP for Portsmouth South
  • Marion Fellows – SNP MP for Motherwell and Wishaw
  • Eleanor Smith – Labour MP for Wolverhampton South West
  • Bill Grant – Conservative MP for Ayr, Carrick and Cumnock

And at the APPG earlier on in the day the following MPs were there:

  • Alison Thewliss – SNP MP for Glasgow Central
  • Bim Afolami – Conservative MP for Hitchen and Harpenden
  • Jon Ashworth – Labour and Co-operative MP for Leicester South
  • Carol Monaghan – SNP MP for Glasgow North West
  • Gavin Newlands – SNP MP for Paisley and Renfrewshire North
  • Jim Shannon – DUP MP for Strangford

If you know your MP was there and we have missed them out then do let us know. We have tried to make this list as accurate as possible, but there were times when we were speaking or organising things, and may have missed somebody.

If your MP said they would come but didn’t turn up, it could well be because there was an important Brexit debate going on. It would be great if you could still follow up with them and invite them to meet you/visit your group/find out more etc.

It was very clear yesterday that the MPs who turned up had been invited by their constituents and that was the reason they had chosen to be there. It really works!

You can also ask all your MPs to drop in to the UNICEF Baby Friendly Call to Action event on the 5th December – more details on that here .

Here’s a selection of photos from our day yesterday. Thank you to everyone who made it possible. Here’s to the next 20 years!

14 Nov

From new mum to Peer Supporter: BfN volunteer stories

Children wearing 'ask my mum about breastfeeding' topsAs part of our 20th anniversary parliamentary reception in Westminster tonight, two of our breastfeeding supporters will be sharing their breastfeeding journeys from new Mum, to qualifying as Breastfeeding Supporters for BfN. We like their stories so much, we want to share them with you too! So here they are.

Gosia’s story
I’ve always liked to think about breastfeeding in two ways. First one, more personal, related to my own experience and second more social.

I think I’m blessed to have breastfed my children for as long as I wanted. My older daughter for 50 months and going strong with my 15 month old boy.

There were a couple of factors that had an impact on fulfilling my breastfeeding wishes. I gave birth to my babies in this country, which at least partially implemented protective law for breastfeeding couples. Moreover, all women in my family breastfeed and this prepared me for the idea that breastfeeding can be associated with some pain in the beginning, although it shouldn’t be. Also my husband and sister were a great support when I most needed it. Possibly this support was the most important part.

On the social level I hope for every child to be healthy and content. This wish pushed me to take action and promote, protect and support breastfeeding.

A lot of supporters are using the comparison of bike riding and breastfeeding. You don’t know how to ride a bike unless you see someone doing it and then practising. So often I feel like a caring tutor who shows women how to ride, shows which path may be less bumpy, gives options for balancing wheels or a bar and most of all encourages and motivates.

I am grateful for volunteering with BfN, making a difference to individuals and the future generation.

A baby's hand pulling at a mother's topMarion’s story

I became a mother at the young and tender age of 41. Medically, I was considered a geriatric mum. However I thought of myself as a lazy mum because I wanted to breastfeed. There was no way I was going to get up in the middle of the night to prepare a bottle or sterilize equipment when all I had to do was lift my top up and feed my baby. My younger sister prepared me – go through the pain and after 3 weeks it will be fine. I never knew that I could access support.

What I did learn was that my newborn baby cried when I put her down and stopped crying when I put her to my chest. It just made sense to keep her close whilst I was also recovering from the birth. A quiet life in the early days whilst I rest and recover.

I have also read that some cultures stay at home for 40 days and 40 nights, partly to recover from the birth and to build a baby’s immune system. I decided that’s exactly what I should do. I was in no hurry to meet the world.  My world was with me, feeding and sleeping safely together.

I read so many baby books but my maternal instinct kicked in. What do animals do? They keep their young close – cuddly and warm, what I now know as skin to skin. Allow them to feed as often and as much as they want . Babies, when they have access to food can not only feed themselves but control how much they want to eat. All I had to do was to sit and learn how to maximize the best feeding position so that I was comfortable and my baby fed efficiently. In fact that can take from 2-3 days up to several weeks to learn.

I found out that there was a local breastfeeding drop-in run by The Breastfeeding Network a charitable organisation that I could attend on a weekly basis, which I did.

What I never realized at the time was how many other women struggle with breastfeeding and that I could help and support them. After a while I took a course to become a breastfeeding helper, and I was soon helping out at my local breastfeeding drop-in.

I live in Islington and I feel lucky that the London borough of Islington commissioned the Breastfeeding Network to run local breastfeeding drop-ins.  I volunteered for 2 and half years. Soon I found myself on another course training to become a Breastfeeding Peer Supporter and I was then paid to support mothers in both UCLH and Whittington hospital. I was trained to visit mothers at home and qualified to run my own breastfeeding drop-in in Islington.