09 Nov

#MakingItWork – Expressing Breastmilk at Work

In the first of our #MakingItWork real-life case studies, Jade tells us about the issues she faced when returning to work, when her daughter was 9 months old.

“I returned to work at my local special needs school. During my back to work meeting, I discussed my need for expressing breaks and a place to go, I was told “I’m sure there is a bathroom you can use” by the assistant head teacher. Obviously I made her aware this is unacceptable and I require a private area to use. It was arranged that I use the medical room, my half hour expressing break was interrupted on more than 4 occasions, one of these times causing me to spill the milk I had spent time pumping. I then fought for 3 more months to find a room every day, despite there being a whole school full, I was told it was not possible to book out a meeting room, or have the same room each day. So on my lunch break every day I would traipse around the school, find an empty room, stick my “expressing mother” sign on the door and do my thing.”

Unfortunately, this isn’t an uncommon story. The law does not currently allow a simple, straightforward right to breastfeeding breaks, though employers are required to provide a place for breastfeeding mothers to rest. The Health and Safety Executive and guidance from the European Commission recommend that employers should provide:

  • access to a private room where women can breastfeed or express breast milk;
  • use of secure, clean refrigerators for storing expressed breast milk while at work, and
  • facilities for washing, sterilising and storing receptacles.

The ladies toilet for example is never a suitable place in which to breastfeed a baby or collect milk.

ACAS guidance also gives the following advice to employers when asked to consider additional breaks for breastfeeding:

“Employers should consider providing short breaks for breastfeeding or expressing milk, weighing it up against the likely impact it might have on the business. Employers should be careful not to discriminate against breastfeeding employees. If employers are unable to grant additional breaks, they could consider slightly extending normal breaks for the employee such as a mid-morning coffee break or leaving earlier in the day to minimise any disruption to the business.”

Each employee will need to have a discussion with their employer – preferably in advance of their return to work – but hopefully this guidance will be helpful in these negotiations, and helping your employer to understand your needs and their obligations.

To read more about Making It Work, BfN’s campaign for breastfeeding mothers returning to work or study, click the image below: